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CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 7:00am EST
from the library announcing for $10 million it but america's birth certificate, the waldseemuller map, the map that gave america its name and the $10 million was the most elaborate spent on anything and $2 million more than was recently paid for the original copy of the declaration of independence and that kind of got my attention and i never heard of or saw the map and the library thought it was worth it and the market thought it was worth more than the declaration of independence and i thought maybe i would do an article or short piece for the atlantic. so i did research and got the basics of the story, pretty quickly. early in the 1500, the eastern part of france, in the mountains, there was a small group of scholars, among them, the map maker, martin waldseemuller and that he came by letters, and an early sailor's chart showing the coastline of the new world and decided that what they were reading about and seeing on the charts of asia, as most people assumed it was but it was a new continent, people traditionally thought of the world as having three parts, europe, asia and africa
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 7:00pm EST
for $10 million a but what it called americans for certification, the map the gave america its name. vechten million dollars was the most diverse finn on anything. it was almost $2 million more than had recently been paid for an original copy of the declaration of independence and that kind of got my attention. i had never heard of the map, had never seen a map but the library seemed to think it was the most valuable piece in the market seemed to think was more than the original copy of the declaration of independence, so i wanted to find out more and at this point i was thinking maybe i would do a short piece for the clint. so i did some research and got the basics of the story pretty quickly. early in the 1500's in the eastern part of france there was a small group of scholars. among them map maker martin waldseemuller and they came across-- y emir guo vespucci in the chart lines of the new world and they decided that what they were reading about in saying on these charts was not a part of asia as most people had assumed it was but in fact was a new continent. people traditionally
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2010 11:15pm EST
based on mutual trust and mutual respect and interest and showed a willingness to criticize america's actions and all too often in the united states it starts by dictating and we don't know all of the factors involved in he had knowledge to the depth of the strains in europe -- relations when there was no reason in america could not restore the same respect in partnership america had with the muslim world as recently as 20 or 30 years ago. in other words, we have to go back 20 or 30 years to find a moment when there was a good working partnership so obama's recognized the mistrust and how far back it dated. and in this lies the essential appeal of obama's words to his cairo audience and he recognized the historic roots of the 21st century and a place that america roll out-- and the role they played. bring in the discussion back i have spent the past 20 years of my life teaching the history of the region and i did write the book. like president obama i do believe the historic background is essential for addressing current affairs and the complex issues in the middle east others a to pa
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 7:00am EST
goes without saying that you all have some of the toughest jobs in america. we think of the jobs that exist here in washington, whether it's the president or vice president or members of the cabinet. but you're on the ground every day. you're in the neighborhoods. you're with real people. and nobody knows more than you do that the real -- the needs of america. and so i'm just really delighted to have a chance to be with all of you and to listen to you. i know the recession has taken a great toll. we think we've tried to -- we have made a difference at the department of transportation. i want you to know -- i know you know this and i know you'll hear this this afternoon. but president obama and all of us at the administration are redoubling our efforts this year to find new ways to grow the economy and create the jobs your communities depends on. as most of you know, i traveled last year to 66 cities. and i met many of you. and i've seen some of the amazing things that you're doing in your communities and some of the amazing products that are transforming sprawling, 21st century c
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 3:00pm EST
like -- for the christopher columbus discovery of america. and we discovered america for ourselves. we knew about america, but what we knew, america very different. we knew something that we learn from the 19th century america. and then this new world and we tried to find out how books, i found this book very interesting, but i just wanted detail of this book of the story, but from that aside, my first wish, was what you wrote this book. 50 years ago, visit from one leader of one country to the united states. i think there may be other leaders came here. sometimes khrushchev was eccentric. and president yeltsin was more eccentric, and when khrushchev came here, he just showed the time like this contemporary politician that we prefer to go to the common show, because most of the young people interest in this, maybe it was part of this. my father's behavior. maybe it was because it was back through the old war mentality on both sides, but not eliminate at that time in one visit, but it would change so why you wrote this? >> guest: i wrote the book because i happen to stumble upon the sto
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 12:00pm EST
anachronism, and as an illegal occupation of cuba territory. most of latin america history have some knowledge of castro's hostility towards the base. but what is generally not known is that from the early 1900s to the present, guantanamo has also been a sight for diplomatic accommodation, compromise, and cooperation. the terms dictated by the platt amendment only stated that the united states would buy or lease naval or station, buy or lease them. in cuba. it did not specify a number of such stations, nor their locations. that was a matter of negotiated compromise between the cuban president and theodore rooseve roosevelt, that the united states would obtain really only one major naval station and that would be guantanamo, not havana. now, obviously, the united states has always had the upper hand in these negotiations. when i say diplomatic compromise, i'm not suggesting that the two parties started on a level playing field. that certainly would not be the case. the second major compromise occurred in 1934 when the united states abrogated the platt amendment, which had become an in
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 11:00am EST
days. and he would argue that america's competitive advantage is in financial products and financial engineering. and that these banks do produce a lot of foreign armies for the u.s. and if we start really knocking down wall street, which is getting competitive advantage to the germans, british, japanese or whoever, i don't agree with that. but you know, i think it underlies a lot of the reluctance of the administration to really get to too tough with wall street that they say it's like yesterday was good for general motors is good for america. now it's what's good for goldman sachs is good for america. not necessary goal but because they are so unpopular. but what's good for jpmorgan chase is good for america. >> no line has been drawn. there's been no edition. basically mathematics. so therefore says that as it may be, deficit. since we are tiptoeing past the cemetery nobody wants to do the math. >> there are some people, the argument here is that banks haven't dealt with a bad debt problem. they're still sitting on their balance sheet so we will end up like japan presumably. i thi
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 10:00am EST
fundamentally changed america. essentially laid the foundations for the kind of society, someone like barack obama, president in 2008. those are the voting rights act of 65, the civil rights act of 64, and the immigration act of 65. they all happened under lyndon johnson and they fundamentally transform who is america, who can vote, who can participate in the american creation of a society in a political system. so what i decided to do what it together this timeline of events from 1965 to the present that are important from an arab-american perspective. some of those events are important to all americans like 9/11. then other things, since the american memory is much shorter than the arab memory there are some events like the 73 energy crisis more than 91 goals or, sort of pass from american memory. and then other events like what happens to alex in california in 1985 are completely unknown to anybody outside of arab-american or out of aggressive circles and yet had quite an impact on the humidity all across the country. so once i decide to assemble a time when i went about and cast each of
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 7:00pm EST
hidden hours. these worries got more intense in 1989 when blood america such night took to the british the whole story, laid it all out for them, lock stock and barrel but by 1989 gorbachev's harbor was beginning to raise. fewer call, president george w. bush met with gorbachev in december, a few months after the defect or on ships at that summit there was no mention of biological weapons at all. to one of the reasons was of course that bush was afraid to bring it up. it will blow up everything else to do was working on, the unification of germany within nato, strategic arms control and gorbachev didn't want to bring it up because of all she knew about the defector. he also realized that talk about biological weapons program on his watch would cause the world to us and questions about new thinking. so there was a little bit of a conspiracy of silence, but the soviet leadership worried terribly about how to respond if they got asked questions. and this continued to envelop or bischoff and bringing in his top advisers including foreign minister and the numerous meetings in the spring abo
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2010 10:00am EST
. >> in her book, "can sexism in america," professor, writer and commentator barbara berg presents a documented argument that women in america hasn't come nearly as far as is generally believed. this event is 50 minutes. >> thank you very much and thank you, barnes & noble, for hosting this event. thank you all for coming. he pulled me by my hair, and he dragged me up 36 metal steps, each one i could feel as my cheek went against them making a mark in my face. i had to spend weeks in the hospital, and i will never look the same again. this story was not the worst i heard, far from the worst, n., while i was researching this book. but when i told a colleague about it, he said, sexism? are you kidding? there's no more sexism in america. that's so passe. and actually that's pretty much the kind of attitude i ran into when i first began to do the study. alive and well, my dentist asks, after hillary almost got the democratic nomination and sarah palin had the number two spot on the republican ticket? how can you say sexism is alive and well? i wonder if he'd say barack obama's presidency
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2010 5:15pm EST
national level but fundamentally changed america and essentially the foundations for the kind of society that could elect somebody like barack obama, president in 2008 and those are the voting rights act of 65, the civil rights act of '64 and immigration act of 65 and most people don't know the legislation's and they all happened under lyndon johnson and fundamentally transform who is american, who can vote, who can participate in the american's creation of a society and political system and so when i decided to do is put together an alternate tie line of defense from 65 to the present that are important from an arab american perspective so of course these are important to all americans like 9/11 and other things since the american memory is much shorter than for example the air of memory. those defense the 73 energy crisis or the 91 gulf war passed from american memory as a significant moments and then other defense like what happens in california 1985 are completely unknown to anybody outside arab america or progress of circles and had quite an impact on the community all acros
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2010 9:00am EST
america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, january 21, 2010. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform te duties of the chair. signed: robert c. byrd, presidet pro tempore. mr. mcconnell: madam president? the presiding officer: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: i want to thank the majority leader for giving me the chance to make my very brief opening remarks as i must leave the building shortly. i thank him. mr. president, the senate's newest member is coming down from massachusetts today and we'll have a chance to welcome senator-elect brown to the capitol. obviously, we're delighted to have him. senator-elect brown has captured the attention of the entire country, but he has captured the attention of massachusetts voters first. and the people of massac
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2009 8:00pm EST
america such an exceptional country? guest coburn there are so many things. i mean a lot of it does come from, from a christian worldview, a christian founding. part of that is freedom of choice so of course they prosper in america but it was disproportionately christians with a christian worldview founding it in part of-- part of what is interesting about that is i mean christ was really upsetting the customs of his day by using so many women for his parables, by administering to women so often. that was very unusual, so as i said before the first feminist was not gloria steinem. it was jesus christ, and there is that the idea of the freedom of choice, i mean literally choice not killing babies choice, and also the idea that all men are created by god and therefore no man has the right to rule over you accept by your consent, except not perfect consent but that is the idea of a federalist democracy that making this a roula for you by divine right because the king has no genetic authority over you. there is and a son of god or some genetic power to roll over their people. that is why do
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2010 8:30pm EST
make anything in america anymore? and why is it so hard to pass a health care bill that guarantees americans healthy lives instead of guaranteeing insurance companies healthy profits? as i traveled from city to city, i heard a sense of resignation from middle-class americans. people laid off for the first time in their lives that team, what did i do wrong? i came away shaken by the sense that the very things that make america great are now in danger. what makes us unique among the nations is this: in america, working people are the middle-class. we built our middle class in the 20th century through hard work, through struggle and visionary political leadership. but a generation of distract this, greed driven economic helices as a voter that progress and now threatens our very identity as a nation. today, on every coast and in between, working women and working men are fighting to join the middle-class and to protect and to rebuild the. we crave political leadership ready to fight for the kind of america that we want to leave to our children and against the forces of greed that prog
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2010 9:00am EST
support teachers. wilson mentions teacher u which our folks teacher america folks participate in teacher u. i'd like to just talk a little bit about how we approach this work. we have a textbook that we've developed that we use with our core members called teaching as leadership. we're releasing a version actually this month or early this month that we're hoping to sort of share that knowledge that we've accumulated by looking at our exceptional teachers more broadly and really just enter into a conversation with people in this sector about what we can do to better prepare and support teachers in general. and one of the things that we focus on that we found in our high performers is their ability to invest students in their work. and, you know, chubb says in his paper students begin lessons unmotivated, they will simply not make the hard effort necessary to learn. agreed. i mean, i couldn't agree more. but i'm not sure that technology will motivate students. i mean, and i'm not sure how you get students to engage in the technology if they have this past of not being successful an
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2010 5:00pm EST
turned the corner. but we need to create more jobs here in america. we know that. we know that one out of 10 americans who want to work cannot find jobs. and our first responsibility must be to help create more jobs so that our economy can rebound and grow. to do that, we need to invest in small businesses. i was pleased to hear the president of the united states last night talk about the importance of small business in our recovery and as we develop our policy need to focus on helping small businesses grow. on american recovery and reinvestment act, we took action, increased the loan limits under the small business administration. we were able to -- to make it less expensive for businesses to borrow from the small business administration much these were good steps that we took. i was proud of an amendment that i offered to increase the surety bond limits so that small companies could get work in this economy. i was proud of the amendment to increase the s.b.a.'s budget so they could have the capacity to help small companies with technical assistance in order to get government jobs. al
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 8:00pm EST
serious intellectual notions are advanced and promulgated in america every single night. michael moore announced on the larry king show capitalism is over. this economic downturn shows it doesn't work. does anyone remember the one you to forget, newsweek ran a cover story, cover story that said we are all socialists now? do you remember that? it was only a few weeks ago and then "newsweek" came back -- john mechem, who's been a guest on my show several times, editor of newsweek, came back with a commentary. they will discover that says we are all socialists now and then he was railing and conservatives for suggesting obama is a crypto socialist. excuse me. on the cover of the magazine saying we are socialists now. the idea that cabalism is doomed -- i told this story in the book about a school in berkeley california that actually every year they would have some gift from the graduating eighth grade class. it was an elementary school private exclusive, very progressive school and the gift of the eighth grade class doubles graduating for 2009 was a beautiful mosaic the set on the wall fr
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 12:00pm EST
interesting because i didn't know it was one thing which was common for me in my life with america that we found out we both were hiding under the tables in the fear of a nuclear war. because it was the solution at that time that the students would be hiding under the table like it would solve anything. i think i didn't like prague. what was happening outside very much, it wasn't very friendly place. it was a dark place. that was not that much fun going on. so in that time i painted everything in our house, some told me i was afraid my father would leave on sunday to begin, but i painted the light switches, and then i found these old chair so i made sort of series of the chairs for people who i wanted to be my friends. so this was somebody who was famous circus artist. this was a famous soccer player. even has the sox. and this was a famous tennis player because you play tennis on clay, so it is red. at that time nobody knew i would become artist in my life. let's face it, as an old person i can now say the chairs are made for sitting and not for painting on them. [laughter] >> this chai
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2010 1:00am EST
states of america will look for dr. joseph mangling and they will check if the ever enter the united states and a historical investigation will be determined that mengele was arrested was true. that third investigation was actually given to the o isi and at the research of israel i was part of that investigation and one of the key elements was to try and find a true survivor of auschwitz by the name of david five men. apparently he worked in the laboratory and survived the war and he was the source of the information that benjamin had given to his superiors in the sea i see. they asked me to try to find him. a friend suggested that i take a look at the international tracing service. i don't know how many of you know, what that is but after the board therein billions of request to the red cross of people who lived in europe during the war. today would be called a data base but in those days was a massive index of cards or files with over 16 million index cards with the names and biographical information of people who live in europe selma who had survived or died. but every person who
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 12:30am EST
people in america and england and france and italy, look at this city and see that you may not abandon the city, that you cannot abandon the city >> instead berlin airlift is launched by a combined allied task force. >> their force assigned more than 300 airplanes and more than 20,000 men to the airlift and britain made a large congregation of both air. ♪ it was an observation without precedent and as a test of precision, of logistics and weather service. >> with 40 to 50 airplanes going simultaneously men's lives -- until the late stages they were flown in five different levels. this called for extremely precise air traffic control. >> some of us had bombed berlin and now we were keeping the same city alive. it meant we had to get more from each airplane and each man than ever before. >> the biggest was the call for utilities. it was packed in the g.i. pumpernickel. we collect bread. and milk for the kids. then medicine. every ounce of cargo was checked >> a new agreement signed in new york between them u.s.s.r. and the united states reaffirmed the removal of all restriction
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2010 10:45am EST
cannot suppress", his collection of essays which critics america's response to it 9/11. howard zinn die geneina 27, 2010 at the age brandeis university in walter massachusetts this is an hour and five minutes. >> when you know, howard came and read here about a. half ago press and not long after he read when i picked up a book called will be we're about the current state of american politics written in by a man who coined the phrase counterculture. in that found out that he couldn't find a single publisher in the u.s. to pick up his book, there was not anyone who touches its. i think people get the impression that as long as books like if i did it by adjacency can get published anything canada published. [laughter] it is not the case so today we are here to celebrate something very fortunate to that looks and not like this can be published, that they cannot suppress it can be published by amazing press is like city lights and we can hear the voice directly and some of the greatest is living in the u.s. today, some of the greatest intellectuals and i'm proud to introduce one of them out.
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 11:00am EST
political and civic institutions in mexico and throughout latin america, the kind of weakening of the states and also civil society that is too fearful to speak up. >> and also the fact we spend $20 billion on the war on drugs. but what are the results? okay, in the drug traffickers revenues are about $40 billion. so who's winning this? >> before we open up for questions, can you just -- if he were to give any advice to the audience in terms of when they read these daily news accounts in the "dallas morning news" and "new york times," the houston chronicle, and we try to understand from a distance was going on and juarez and other cities in mexico. what would you say are some of the discourses to watch for, and it's even the press is kind of putting out there that my kind of mislead us in terms of understanding what's really happening on the ground facts >> i guess this idea to people involved in the drug world deserve to die and that doesn't really matter because they're criminals. mexico is a great country, a wonderful country. it's our ally, it's our neighbor. and when we see t
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2010 7:00am EST
philadelphia. but it was great. that's america. the truth is, that more is available to more people than ever before. and anyone who doesn't see the added opportunities, comfort, life expectancy, educational opportunities, that we have that would have been undreamed of for our parents and grandparents, anyone who doesn't see that is deliberately blind and deaf. and limited, and embittered. my grandfather was a barrel maker. he came over from ukraine in 1910. he never stayed in a hotel in his life. why would you? that would be very rare for americans to one of the figured that i have in my book, people are not going to believe it but it's an official labor department figure and you know they wouldn't lie. labor department of the united states, typical american family, today spends more and eating out in dinners and is a fast food restaurant or luxuries restaurants or different kind of restaurant than the family spends on health care. and we spend too much on health care. the idea that capitalism is dead, i go into the reasons why capitalism is not dead. .com is very much alive and has bee
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 1:00am EST
pin factory. if you get one guy to try to make it nail, a pen or a nail, i have been in america so long i don't know which is british and american anymore but anyway he called it a pen factory. if you get one worker to try to make it nail it might take him all week with its 20 workers specializing in one individual tests such as cutting the metal, sharpening the end and attaching the ped you get enormous increase in productivity and only a few people can make tens of thousands of nails and a week so it is a simple example but the division of labor spread across the entire economy has produced enormous productivity growth. the other aspect of free market which smith identified in which again i think is true is that you get rewarded for success and punished for failure. not always. on wall street it doesn't necessarily work out that way. in general that the business produces things, a restaurant produces provided good service they do well when they can make profits. if they do badly and produce shoddy goods they got a business. that is the simple feedback mechanism but something lack
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2010 10:00am EST
the idea of a vacation. now, this may be a disappearing dream in america. i understand that, but the idea of a vacation, the idea of a 40 hour week, no child labor, these were ideas that were promoted 150 years ago by people like karl marx, if i may utter the words. karl marx did not create the soviet union. karl marx was a 19th century radical who sat around trying to figure out how to help working people, and had this idea with many other people, that working people have to work less than an 80 hour week. so they could think, so they could enjoy life, so they could read books. and i guess him being karl marx, so that they could go to a lot of meetings. and eventually, form unions. and out of that effort, there came the first transnational labor movement that led to labor unions in time, and lead to social democratic parties in europe, and lead to specific legislation, like vacations and the eight hour day. so who goes around thinking i'm on vacation, thank god for the labor movement? not many. i don't know where we think these things come from, but the book is an attempt to anchor
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2010 8:00pm EST
america and what can we do as a country to make broadband more ubiquitous and more available for other countries. so fatter and faster pipes for more americans. our broadband team has given us a number of regimes over the past few months and it's really going to boil down to a think a matter of supply and demand. as simple as that. so what we do to make sure there is adequate supply and fatter and faster pipes? what can we do to make the exact a price for service broadband connections of public types? what we do to make them fatter and faster for american? what we need to make them more affordable? and what can we do to help americans want to subscribe more to broadband? and stuff really involves just a plethora of issues. so, we haven't yet seen the draft detailed plan. we've only seen outlines from our broadband plan team. and we're looking forward to seeing more in advance of what will probably be a vote or meeting at least where it's presented on february 11. >> host: what happened on february 11 or february the 17th when i get delivered? as congress has to approve it as part of th
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 10:00pm EST
still trying to accomplish after seven years. [laughter] everybody in america is polite and cheerful but we will let you know, it and then they said he is not going home. i was not invited as much and i really did not know what to do with myself. i remember one day i met and she was collecting paintings and said i wonder if we could pay for that. i paid for them and tried to blow up the inside of the stereo. [laughter] and i started to do it without it. she was the head of the municipal art gallery. i did not understand i was there for free and people pay for this school and i was supposed to be nice to them so they would keep paying. but was prepared to sacrifice everything and i thought they would have to stay up all night in they said this is california why should we stay up all night? we can do that in the daytime. i a understand that now. i've lost my teaching job. a friend said sent this to maurice sendak. the things that we talk about today are based on my misunderstanding and i have no intention to go into children's books he called me collect i really did not want t
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2010 9:45am EST
warn america of the dangers of nazism and the terrorism that might be involved with the world war. and to wake us out of our isolationism and our rejection of the world around us and so forth. and i find it just incredible because he would keep doing this. and the portrait are terrific. the nixon ones are just too much. i mean, cry me out of the sewer. but the one i put up on my wall -- a couple days days -- this is where herb -- herb had a sense -- a pressien. he could foresee events. the day after the watergate break-in, june 17th, i think i was assistant manager of the paper at the time. and herb did a cartoon of the white house. it's in there. the white house, there's the white house. and then there's a gum oe, a guy looking -- a detective -- he's got footprints leading back and forth from the white house. it's strange they all seem to be connected to the place. there were crimes -- [laughter] stfter the break-in. just incredible. and that was his gift. i do think that you will find -- and i will you will share my enthusiasm and the belief of why he was a great cartoonist -- herb w
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2010 12:00pm EST
strength of america. our ability to take on tough challenges and meet them. whether it was world war i or world war ii, th the great depression, all of the challenges that this country has faced. over and over america has proven that it's up to the challenge. i believe we're up to this challenge as well. and i believe people working together can come up with solutions that would be credible not only to markets in this country, but markets around the world that are beginning to wonder: does america have the ability to face up to the debt threat that overhangs the future economic strength of the country? mr. president, i appreciate this time. i thank the chairman for allowing this time and i know that senator gregg will be coming to the floor in about an hour for his presentation on the same subject. i thank the chair and yield the floor. senator from montana. mr. baucus: mr. president, the senator from north dakota makes a very compelling case for fiscal discipline. he's been making this case for a good number of years. he's on the forefront of -- of urging us and the congress and country
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2010 12:00pm EST
, said -- quote -- "the fact that we are here today to debate raising america's debt limit is a sign of leadership failure. it is a sign that the u.s. government can't pay its own bills." don't take it from me. take it from the president of the united states. we've got to do more. i'm disappointed that gregg-conrad faismed it wasn't -- failed. it wasn't perfect. but it was something. i hope that senator coburn's amend -- i'm skeptical. the american people get it. the american people understand that this is a problem. that's why we have these big swings in these elections. the same passion that propelled president obama into office is the same that propelled the senator from massachusetts into office from two opposite parties. because the american people are frustrated that this body doesn't work. and if we don't change the rules an start to get serious and we get muddling along the path of disaster, we're going to fail our country. now, we may not get it done while i'm here in the senate. i only have this year. but i'm going to keep coming to the floorks mr. president. and i'm going to
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2010 11:00pm EST
something we have to live with but we make anything in america any more? and why is it so hard to pass a health care bill that guarantees americans healthy lives instead of guaranteeing insurance companies healthy profits. as i traveled from city to city i heard a sense of resignation from middle class americans. people laid off for the first time in their lives asking what do i do wrong. i came away shaken by the sense that the very things that make america great are now in danger. what makes us unique among the nations is this. in america working people are the middle class. we build our middle class and the 20th century through hard work, struggle and visionary political leadership. but a generation of destructive driven economic policies has eroded that progress and now threatens our very identity as a nation. today on every coast and in between, working women and working men are fighting to join the middle class and project and rebuilt. we crave political leadership ready to fight for the kind of america that we want to leave our children, and against whom the forces of greed that b
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2010 12:00pm EST
non-fiction. he is to me and to many americans america's greatest storyteller in history. he has been enormously successful. the winner of major awards for his books and for his lifetime devotion to american history. .. >> you have produced over the years and novels such as liberty tavern that came down 1977 just to remind you of fabric of the difficulties in the book of life during the american revolution. still lives that came out in 1981 about three west point soldiers and their wives about the resignation of the officers' wives that they would be for the rest of their lives so he has told a wonderful story. the lives of our -- "the intimate lives of the founding fathers" this book, end this incredible book just published within the last couple of weeks the influence of women in the shaping of our history, with men who were the mothers, wives, daughters, a nd friends of the founding fathers, washington, frankli n, adams, a hamilton, jefferson, madison , a very different women. enormously interesting providing material for the rebidding stories of the founders as we mentioned before
CSPAN
Jan 8, 2010 12:00pm EST
america? here are your choices. the availability of guns, that way parents raise their children today, or the influence of popular culture such as movies, television and internet. absent from your list of choice is the person who pulls the trigger. with a gun. and this one of course is totally generic did not refer to any one individual or specifically. newsweek september 2008, do you have reservations about electing a woman vice president who, a., has a new child with special needs, b., a teenage daughter who is pregnant? but the results are really what's astonishing. its astonishing anybody spend money especially they're losing money on those questions, but 80% said they had no reservation of electing an unnamed woman vice president who has a child with special needs. 91% said no reservations for a woman who has a teenage daughter who's also brigadier but i think you get the joke that even if fathers don't. let's talk about 2000. hot issues, hot buttons, hot candidates, what we see happening. although bit of perspective. 2008 politically was off about individuals. the main narrative
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2010 8:30am EST
rest in the knowledge that america has seen these times before. just over a year ago as my fellow governors and i gathered with our newly-elected president in philadelphia, i sat in the chambers of our nation's first capitol at congress, congress hall. and my mind couldn't help but wandering back to those earliest days of our nation and to the founding fathers. there in those hallowed surroundings i couldn't help but reflect on their courage and their optimism in the face of ultimate uncertainty. their hope was against all odds, but it was the, their spirit that the time demanded of them. think back to the early months of revolutionary war, if you will, with me. we know that families from savannah to boston had begin their father -- given their fathers and sons to the american cause can. and it is, as it is with war, as it is today many of them would never return to their homes. general george washington and his army faced seemingly insurmountable odds. it was cold, his men were ill equipped and outmatched. it was then on december the 23rd, 1776, only two days before that pivotal
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 8:00am EST
. millions of irish people came to america speaking irish. the words didn't go away, they just transmuted into american. danny is the first person who has gone through it and there were communist words in the american language straight irish. we have not been shy to criticize the bush administration. we don't think the democratic party is the answer to everything. a dime's worth of difference basically saying -- in many ways between the two parties. lot of democrats got pretty mad. we occupy a different site. we figure pretty large. when people say we must like the democratic party, we are staying out. you know lot about life and the world. that is what we are about. listening to the sound of my father at 5:00 in the morning, a ten word typewriter tracking away. that was a different era. i grew up with hot metal type in newspapers. my dad who was a great writer, i applaud -- one telephone line from southern ireland in the middle 50s. he finished writing his article and jumped on his bike to ride three miles to tell. only time he got mad at me in my childhood was when i got fed up with him
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 7:00pm EST
a microcosm of america. >> obviously you've read books and magazines. why didn't you just name some books and magazines? >> and obviously i have of course all my life. i'm a lover of books and magazines and newspapers. but asked that question even early on in the interview i was already so in light and was unprofessional of me to wear that an alliance on my sleeve. >> you couldn't think of any in the moment. >> it was more of are you kidding are you asking me? to me it was in the context of do you read? how to use the informed? it seemed like she was discovering this nomadic tribe, a tribe from some the end of all caved in alaska asking me how do you stay in touch with the real world. that's how i took the question so i kind of, well, i didn't roll my eyes and was annoyed with the question and got, you iow with the state of journalism today is no matter what i say to her it will probably be a twisted and perceived as a bit negative. >> host: anne kornblut, what was happening within the campaign during that moment? >> guest: even that early on she noted heart early in the campaign th
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2010 12:30am EST
. fighting the war in latin america and i raise the question to the other scholars if you are serious about getting rid of drugs then we need socialism. [laughter] [applause] royte? we do. why people use drugs. people have mental problems sometimes. too much stress in their lives. they worry about losing their job, they worry about their children getting middelkerke. the wording about losing their care, and this system solved all the problems, the workers during a certain type to the eckert time had a lifelong security. they never needed to worry about losing their jobs. the factory, the work consider their own factory. when my father would tell me my father was sick in the 70's. he has a breathing problem, so when he called he was breathing very hard. on the chinese new year the chinese society closed for about seven days so every factory was closed for seven days at holidays. but my father always insisted he needed to be the guard for the factory when other workers go home to celebrate. .. the factory cannot fire him. why? if a worker refused to work, there must be something wrong w
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2010 8:00pm EST
estimated 30 million adults in the united states of america cannot read. 30 million, that is one in seven in the most powerful country on earth who cannot read. if it were a state would be the second largest state in the country behind california. it's like combining every citizen of new york state and ohio singing folks there can't read. all of us know someone who struggles with literacy so that is the story i know well. there are 3 million people in our country to stutter, people like me whose daughter to the cause trouble with language. we all know someone who struggles. high was one of those kids and my mother, siblings, france would finish my sentences when others would laugh. in the book i also talked about my career at cbs news and all the things that helped me get from the particulars of learning to manage my reading issues, the help i got learning to manage my stuttering ecology by going to read first if i can a story from the beginning of the book. and it speaks to how all of us who have struggled oftentimes struggled never shows up by itself. it brings sisters and brother
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2010 9:00am EST
america. an all day hearing, live coverage here on c-span2. >> my fellow commissioners, i'm grateful to all of our witnesses for giving us their testimony and sharing their wisdom. we've been given a critical mission. one that goes far beyond any party or even policy agenda. to conduct a full and fair inquiry in to what brought america's financial system to its knees. we're after the truth, the hard facts, because it's our job to provide an unbiased accounting of the actions that led to devastating economic consequences for so many american families. we'll follow the evidence, wherever it leads, we'll use our subpoena power as needed, and if we find wrongdoing, we will refer it to the proper authorities. that's what the american people want. that's what they deserve of. and that's what this commission is going to give them. some already speak of the financial crisis, in the past tense, as some kind of historical event. the truth is, it is still here. and still very real. 26 million americans are unemployed, or can't find full-time work, or have given up even looking for jobs. over tw
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2010 5:00pm EST
luther king's birthday. he had a dream about america and our people. his "i have a dream" speech is one of the most famous and most quoted in the english language. our little chat tonight will never be viewed in that league. but i would suggest to you that we should all have a dream about mississippi's future. i believe a time is fast approaching when mothers and grandmothers in our state will see their children and grandchildren staying in mississippi to make their careers and their futures because mississippi will be the best place, the place that offers the best opportunities to be productive, have a successful career, and a great quality of life for their families. that day is not far off. 2010 is the year when we will lead america out of this recession. the year when we will pick up where we left off before the recession that sidetracked our growing economy and rising incomes. we can and will out perform the national economy. we were doing it before this global recession. and we'll be doing it again. so my advice to you as we close: is mississippi, believe in it. thank you y'all ve
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 6:00am EST
, which is a government takeover of the government system in america. mr. baucus: mr. president, i've got to address that one. my colleagues want to speak. i think it's worth repeating over and over and over again. this legislation is designed to retain uniquely american solution to health care, roughly half public, half private. it's designed to make sure that patients can still as they should, choose that your own doctor and doctor they want, primary doc specialist, no gatekeeper and that sort of stuff. the doctor able to make their own decisions in consultation with their patients, d doc-patient, and in addition to that, frankly, more competition with the exchanges. this legislation, frankly, is -- is rooted almost entirely on -- maintain the current free market system in health care. there is an insurance market reform, which i think everybody agrees with and is denying preexisting conditions for denying coverage. and there is a modest expansion of medicaid, lower-income people that otherwise can't get health care. but otherwise this is legislation rooted in the current american syste
CSPAN
Jan 29, 2010 6:00am EST
of understanding what happened in order to prepare america to avoid a repetition that led to the creation of the 9/11 commission. one of the findings of the 9/11 commission was the ultimate threat to the united states was when the worst weapons fell into the hands of the worst people. that led congress to create our commission to evaluate what is our level of preparation to avoid the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, particularly into the hands of terrorists. so it was appropriate that we started the day by giving back to the beginnings of this effort with families 9/11. our report on today comes eight years after 9/11. it comes one year after the publication of the report which was entitled world at risk, purposefully titled to indicate this is not one nation's problem, this is a global problem because it is the earth which is at risk, and one month after the failed attempt at an aviation bombing on christmas day there is some good news. the good news is particularly in the area of nuclear terrorism that the trend lines here seem to be running in the right direction.
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2010 5:00pm EST
and, of course, there are big differences between asia and america economy in some eastern european economies but on the whole the picture that has been a good deal better than what we expected one year ago. now, why is that the case? uri dadush diluted to the reasons. if you go back a year we all have certainly underestimated the depth of the contraction of the global economy. that then materialize in the fourth quarter of 2008 and the first quarter 2009. we were puzzled by the deep ball and attributed it to basically the fear of a global depression so confidence factors and it's hard to gauge these confidence factor is correctly. what i'm seeing right now, we've had a strong policy response to this fear of depression and the turmoil in the markets. exceptional monetary measures with interest rates cut close to zero in many advanced economies with unconventional support made available. and we've seen fiscal stimulus deployed in emerging economies and then also seen recapitalization of banks and guarantees for banks in order to get the financial sector running. i can what is all thi
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 9:00pm EST
americans america's greatest storyteller particularly of history. he's been enormously successful. the winner of major awards for his books and his lifetime devotion to american history. i think we can spend the entire evening here all the time we have allotted just reviewing the numerous books and articles tom has written works on franklin, washington, jefferson, truman, fdr, american war, the hamilton through culbert toole, the outstanding volume he produced to accompany the major 1997 pbs production liberty. of course the recent perils of peace which deals with but even after the surrender of the british at yorktown in 1781. a great personal memoir of your upbringing in jersey city which as you know is my home town as well so we have that in common. and so much more on the american revolution, frederic leadership of george washington and his military struggles to achieve american independence. and now the subject of tonight's conversation, the role of women in american history. we see this in the fiction and nonfiction you've produced over the years in her novels such as liberty tav
CSPAN
Jan 8, 2010 9:00am EST
visible challenges that exist in our southern neighbor, mexico, and in latin america and i was raised someone that was trained to look east and west, even raised in southern california, i didn't look south very much and yet in the global world that we're living in right now, we have to focus more and more there as well. so there are challenges associated with latin america. certainly the emergence of china and what does that mean and the economic and i pay a lot of attention to the economic end, whether it's china, india, europe or us or brazil, and what does that mean in the future, because i think in the long run, it's going to be those engines that really drive out, and so it's important that we pay a lot of attention to what's going on in other parts of the world. we stood up last, i guess about a year and a half ago now, for the sole purpose of being able to focus our engagement strategy from the military perspective on africa, which is a wonderful continent of great resources, wonderful people, and huge challenges, whether it's famine or disease, and i think the world nee
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2010 12:00pm EST
issue. and i had knowledge of any discussion about britain and america. as far as what i recall, the dossier and timelines was because one of the drafts i in one of the drafts i genuinely did not understand that saddam hussein could get a nuclear weapon in place than was essentially was removed. mr. dingellman, the council's q.c. took me through the issue in some detail and pointed out the institute of studies said you could get a weapon in nine months. if we were in the business i think we would have been pressing for that. so i'm afraid on this whole business of us trying to align with the americans -- if that was going on in the intelligence level i have no idea. but in terms of my role in relation to the dossier, i have nothing to do with it. >> the prime minister shares your worries about -- the this paragraph that was in the september of 16th draft and you would like a timeline as, quote, radiological device, nuclear bomb in one to two years which is different than what was in the 16th and that does start on align with the americans. but it makes it much more specific. >> well,
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2010 12:30am EST
afghanistan. we have only come out of iraq in the sense not a single america kin casualty of the most recent month because we have withdrawn troops and because we have gotten behind barriers and because the president said i am taking the troops out. over the objections of everybody else. i don't see that is possible to happen in afghanistan the next six months it might be possible one year from now and that is why president obama is willing to go along with the 30,000 troops to surge even though he pledged during the campaign not to do things like that it is part of our judgment as the most important pragmatist next to nixon because the outlook is similar he is perfectly willing to do things than you, and then the bush administration was not willing to do do two talk with iran and north korea and with a concerted effort to achieve through diplomacy something we don't have to have military involvement but he is not strong enough to say no more troops for afghanistan but the basic problem is where it is said decision-making made and how does it get made? the idea that cramer had of prov
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2010 7:30am EST
taking place this month. across america, 49 of the addresses are being given, almost all under conditions far more grim than those we confront. the one national study of able says that our budget problem is one of the smallest in the nation. our days most celebrated business sage says, you don't know who's been swimming naked until the tide goes out. [laughter] >> well, the tide is out, and now we know. compared to its budget, illinois fiscal problem is four times larger than ours. arizona's, five times. california's, six times. out there, the governor recently explained in desperation, how could we let something like that happen? so far at least, no one in this room has to ask that question. a young seaman sought a better bareness advice, asking what do i do when i find myself in a gale force wind with a dangerous reef to leeward? to which the old sea captain replied, what you do is, you don't get yourself in that position. through the discipline of legislators on this floor, and as a verb, businesslike management of my colleagues and those about gimmies, indiana stands in a p
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2010 9:30am EST
america first movement during this period before the war. then they turned their guns on coghlan. and you know, and bill, the attorney general, found themselves forced to proceed against kaufman because of the pm campaign. and social justice, this vicious journal, like fox news is fair and now, social justice was the newspaper. was shut down. on the basis of having bad ideas that and it was pm those in the forefront of trying to shut it down by having bad ideas. i think that was going a bit far, but anyway it was one of his campaign. campaign. then he campaigned against the hearst press and what it called the mccormick axis of newspaper, the chicago tribune, the daily news and "washington times." what are all owned by the same families with her pro-fascist politics, which i think you adequately talk, usually talk about well. but again, they wanted to shut those papers to, but there was not a chance that that was going to happen. you were going to shut down the most populous papers in the country. they also contribute to the political scene by documenting how the leading industrial firms i
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 11:00am EST
warming and the price of gasoline are not the only problems presented by america's love of anne lutz fernandez speak for 15 minutes at the new canaan, connecticut library. >> thank you, hello. welcome, and first of all i'd like to think all stray books for inviting me to speak tonight and thank you for coming to listen. my name is anne lutz fernandez, and i wanted to share with you initially just our decision to write the book, where that came from. and it really all happened just a few miles from here at my home in norwalk over thanksgiving weekend about four years ago. my sister and i, were there, our family had gathered, and from various points, driven of course the norwalk and my driveway was filled with cars. and spent a beautiful weekend celebration together. but in very good, as it happened over the past prior few years, the conversation turned to the loss of our cousins in a car crash. shortly after we lost christy, i lost a good friend and a highway crash. these two losses have a profound effect on our lives. we started chewing on the contradictions that the car present, par
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